Archive | fiction

Shelley Day

Shelley Day

Shelley Day Sclater was born in Newcastle and lives in Edinburgh. In former lives, she has been a lawyer, an academic psychologist and a research professor, in which capacities she wrote and edited numerous articles and books on topics as diverse as surrogacy, autonomy, identity, and divorce. Shelley now mainly writes fiction and has studied Creative Writing at Newcastle and Edinburgh Universities. Shelley’s short stories have been published in newspapers, magazines, on-line and in anthologies, most recently in New Writing Scotland 31.

 Shelley’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/pascalebientot

Shelley’s website: https://shelleyday.com/

Shelley is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Shelley

The Confessions of Stella Moon
Contraband, July 2016

1977: A killer is released from prison and returns home to a decaying, deserted boarding house choked with weeds and foreboding. Memories of strange rituals, gruesome secrets and shame hang heavy in the air, exerting a brooding power over young Stella Moon. She is eager to restart her life, but first she must confront the ghosts of her macabre family history and her own shocking crime. Guilt, paranoia and manipulation have woven a tangled web of truth and lies. All is ambiguous. Of only one thing is she certain. Stella Moon killed her own mother.

Praise for The Confession of Stella Moon:

A truly compulsive drama of guilt, manipulation and paranoia, the narrative shifts effortlessly between otherworldly scenes, searing memories and everyday realities. Laced also with plenty of quirky humour and an irresistible 1970s ambience, this thriller is a highly original but always page-turning read.
Irish Times

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30840199-the-confession-of-stella-moon

Cass Green

Cass Green
THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR
Cass Green

Had me gripped from first page to last – completely under the spell of prim yet twisted narrator Hester, a pensioner with an exhilaratingly pitch-black heart of darkness beneath her twinset and pearls
Ruth Ware, author of In A Dark Dark Wood

Two suburban women. Two dark secrets. The almost perfect murder.

Melissa and Hester have lived next door to each other for years. When Melissa’s daughter was younger, Hester was almost like a grandmother to her. But recently they haven’t been so close.

Hester has plans to change all that. It’s obvious to her that despite Melissa’s outwardly glamorous and successful life, she needs Hester’s help.

But taking help from Hester might not be such a good idea for a woman with as many secrets as Melissa…
Cass Green - The Woman Next Door
Cass Green is the adult pen name of Caroline Green, an award -winning author of fiction for young people. Her first novel, Dark Ride won the RONA Young Adult Book of the Year and the Waverton Good Read Award. Cracks and Hold Your Breath garnered rave reviews and were shortlisted for eleven awards between them, including: The Amazing Book Award; The Catalyst Book Award The Leeds Book Award; The Hampshire Book Award; Sefton Super Reads, the Oldham Book Award and The Stockport Book Award. She is the Writer in Residence at East Barnet School and teaches Writing for Children at City University. Caroline has been a journalist for over twenty years and has written for many broadsheet newspapers and glossy magazines.

World English: HarperCollins
All other rights: JBA

Anja de Jager

Anja de Jager
Anja de Jager is a London-based native Dutch speaker who writes in English. She draws inspiration from cases that her father, a retired police detective, worked on in the Netherlands. Anja has written a number of short stories, some of which have been shortlisted for Mslexia. She is currently working on the next Lotte Meerman novel.

… a novel brilliantly evoking the isolation of a woman with an unbearable weight on her conscience.” – Sunday Times

A Cold Death In Amsterdam
Anja de Jager A Cold Death in Amsterdam
A Cold Death In Amsterdam introduces Lotte Meerman, a Cold Case detective still recovering from the emotional devastation of her previous investigation. A tip-off leads Lotte to an unresolved ten-year-old murder case in which her father was the lead detective. When she discovers irregularities surrounding the original investigation that make him a suspect, she decides to cover for him. She doesn’t tell her boss about the family connection and jeopardises her career by hiding evidence. Now Lotte has to find the real murderer before her acts are discovered, otherwise her father will go to jail and she will lose her job, the one thing in life she still takes pride in . . .

Published by Constable, November 2015

Anja is represented by Allan – allan@jennybrownassociates.com

E S Thomson

E S Thomson

Elaine Thomson was born in Ormskirk, Lancashire. She has a PhD in the history of medicine and works as a university lecturer in Edinburgh. She was shortlisted for the Saltire First Book Award and the Scottish Arts Council First Book Award. Elaine lives in Edinburgh with her two sons.

Elaine’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/es_thomson

E. S. Thomson is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by E. S. Thomson

Beloved Poison

Constable, March 2016
North America: Pegasus

E S Thomson - Beloved Poison

Ramshackle and crumbling, trapped in the past and resisting the future, St Saviour’s Infirmary awaits demolition. Within its stinking wards and cramped corridors the doctors bicker and fight. Ambition, jealousy and hatred seethe beneath the veneer of professional courtesy. Always an outsider, and with a secret of her own to hide, apothecary Jem Flockhart observes everything, but says nothing.

And then six tiny coffins are uncovered, inside each a handful of dried flowers and a bundle of mouldering rags. When Jem comes across these strange relics hidden inside the infirmary’s old chapel, her quest to understand their meaning prises open a long-forgotten past – with fatal consequences.

In a trail that leads from the bloody world of the operating theatre and the dissecting table to the notorious squalor of Newgate and the gallows, Jem’s adversary proves to be both powerful and ruthless. As St Saviour’s destruction draws near, the dead are unearthed from their graves whilst the living are forced to make impossible choices. And murder is the price to be paid for the secrets to be kept.

Praise for Beloved Poison

You can almost feel the evil miasma rising from the page
Kirkus Reviews

This outstanding debut historical enthrals with its meticulously researched details
Library Journal

A wonderfully engrossing and evocative read
The Book Bag

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28933550-beloved-poison

Ann O’Loughlin

Ann O'Loughlin

A leading journalist in Ireland for nearly thirty years, Ann O’Loughlin has covered all the major news events of the last three decades. She spent much of her career with independent newspapers, as a Security Correspondent at the height of the troubles and a senior journalist at both the Irish Independent and the Evening Herald. Ann is currently a senior journalist with the Irish Examiner, primarily covering legal issues. Originally from the west of Ireland, Ann now lives in Co. Wicklow with her husband and two children.

Ann’s website: http://annoloughlin.blogspot.co.uk/

Ann’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/annolwriter

Ann O’Loughlin is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Ann

The Judge’s Wife
Black & White, July 2016

Ann O'Loughlin - The Judge's Wife

When Emma returns to Dublin to put her estranged father’s affairs in order, she begins to piece together the story of his life and that of Grace, the mother she never knew. She knows her father as the judge – as stern and distant at home as he was in the courtroom. But as she goes through his personal effects, Emma begins to find clues about her mother that shock her profoundly.

A tale of enduring love and scandal that begins in 1950s Dublin and unravels across decades and continents, digging up long-buried family secrets along the way, The Judge’s Wife asks whether love really can last forever.

Praise for The Judge’s Wife

Ridiculously pleasurable to read
Sunday Times

A love story hovering between the Philomena territory of Ireland in the 1950s and […] 80s is told with skilful ease by Ann O’Loughlin
Irish Examiner

A stunning book that broke my heart, on more than one occasion. It was devastating, it was perfect and it was beautiful. I couldn’t stop thinking about the characters and their lives long after I’d read the last page.   A magnificent read!
Kim The Bookworm

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30235391-the-judge-s-wife

The Ballroom Café
Black & White, May 2015

North America: Skyhorse Publishing
Germany: Goldmann Verlag

Ann O'Loughlin - The Ballroom Cafe

Sisters Ella and Roberta O’Callaghan live in separate wings of their crumbling Irish mansion. They haven’t spoken for decades, torn apart by a dark family secret from their past, and only communicate through the terse and bitter notes they leave for each other in the hallway.

Debbie, an American woman, is searching for her birth mother. She has little time left but as she sets out to discover who she really is and what happened to her mother, she is met by silence and lies at the local convent.

With the bank threatening, Ella tries to save the family home by opening a café in the ballroom much to Roberta’s disgust. And when Debbie offers to help out in the café, the war between the sisters intensifies. But as Debbie finally begins to unravel the truth, she uncovers an adoption scandal that will rock both the community and the warring sisters.

Powerful and poignant, The Ballroom Café is a moving story of love lost and found.

Praise for The Ballroom Café

Secrets emerge, there’s a whopper of a twist and this unabashed tear-jerker ends with a well-earthed, well-calculated emotional finale
The Irish Times

A moving tale of loss, love and redemption
Bella Magazine

Deftly written, moving and courageous
The Sunday Times

Slow-marching, romantic prose draws us into an old world that is rustic, genteel, quaint…[but] scandals lie in wait
Irish Independent

Highly engaging debut you will want to dive into
Sunday Independent, Ireland

Sally Magnusson

Sally Magnusson

Raised in Glasgow, Sally Magnusson is a Scottish writer and broadcaster. She began her career at The Scotsman before moving to the BBC, notably as a long-serving presenter of BBC Scotland’s Reporting Scotland news programme. She has worked on a range of programmes, including BBC Breakfast Time, BBC 2’s The Daily Politics, Panorama and Songs of Praise. She is the founder and chair of Playlist for Life, a charity that encourages access to personalised music on iPods for people with dementia.

In 2009 Sally received an honorary Doctorate of Letters from Glasgow Caledonian University. Her memoir of her mother’s dementia, Where Memories Go, won her the Glenfiddich Spirit of Scotland Award for Writing in 2014 as well as being shortlisted for the Saltire Literary Book of the Year award.

Sally’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/sallymag1

Sally Magnusson is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Sandra Low Ireland

Sandra Lowe Ireland

Sandra Ireland was born in Yorkshire, lived for many years in Éire, and is now based in Angus, Scotland. She began her writing career as a correspondent on a local newspaper, but quickly realised that fiction is much more intriguing than fact. In 2013 she was awarded a Carnegie-Cameron Scholarship to study for an Mlitt in Writing Practice and Study at the University of Dundee, graduating with a distinction in 2014.

Sandra’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/22_ireland

Sandra is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Sandra Ireland

Beneath the Skin
Polygon, September 2016
Sandra Ireland - Beneath the Skin

Taking a job in the studio of an Edinburgh taxidermist probably isn’t Walt’s wisest decision. Suffering from combat stress and struggling to outrun the demons from his past, he now finds himself confronted by the undead on a daily basis.

His enigmatic boss, Alys, and her sister, Mouse, have their own uneasy relationship with the past. Someone doesn’t want to let them go. Can Walt save Mouse’s eight-year-old son, William, from becoming the next victim? And can he save himself?

Deliciously disturbing, this psychological thriller peels back the skin of one modern family to reveal the wounds no one wants to see. It deals with the effects of trauma and how facing up to vulnerability is sometimes the only way to let go of the past.

Ever Dundas

Ever-Dundas

Ever Dundas gained a Creative Writing Masters with Distinction from Edinburgh Napier University in 2011, and she has a First Class Degree in Psychology and Sociology from Queen Margaret University. She has had several short stories and dark fairy tales published and her work has been shortlisted for awards. She is currently working on her second novel.

Website: https://bloodonforgottenwalls.wordpress.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/everdundas

Ever Dundas is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Ever Dundas

Goblin
Freight, 2017

ever dundas - goblin

The Pet Massacre is a little-known episode in the second world war when Londoners voluntarily brought their dogs and cats to be put down, fearful of lack of food, and of bombing. It’s estimated that around 750,000 pets were destroyed in one week.

Goblin opens during the London Blitz and nine year old Goblin is running amok over the bomb sites. One day she witnesses an atrocity. A fervent animal lover, Goblin is appalled by the piled up mounds of dead pets, the pet massacre, and she takes photographs – but she also captures on film an incident which leaves her traumatised. Goblin buries the camera in a cemetery and erases the episode from her mind.

In 2011 London is again alight during the Riots, and by this time Goblin is an old woman, living in Edinburgh with her menagerie. The camera is discovered by a cemetery caretaker, the photographs are developed and released to the press, and Britain is outraged to learn about the massacre of pets seventy years before. But the police also discover the last photograph, and the nation’s shock changes to a murder investigation. The hunt is on for the adult who took those photographs as a child, the only one who can help police with enquiries. Should Goblin turn herself in and force herself to remember the event which changed her life forever?

This is a devastating and magical debut which continues to haunt long after reading the final page.

Jackie Copleton

Jackie Copleton

Jackie Copleton lived in Nagasaki and Sapporo where she taught English before returning to England and becoming a journalist. This is her first novel.

A Dictionary of Mutual Understanding
a dictionary of mutual understanding

‘What and how much should I admit to myself, and to others? Should I begin with this acknowledgement: my daughter Yuko might be alive today if I had loved her in a different way?’

When a badly scarred man knocks on the door of Amaterasu Takahashi’s retirement home and says that he is her grandson, she doesn’t believe him.

But if you’ve become adept at lying, can you tell when someone is speaking the truth? Amaterasu knows her grandson and her daughter died the day the Americans dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki; she searched for them amongst the ruins of her devastated city and has spent years burying her memories of that brutal summer. So this man is either a miracle or a cruel trick.

The stranger forces Amaterasu to revisit her past; the hurt and humiliation of her early life, the intoxication of a first romance, the fierceness of a mother’s love. For years she has held on to the idea that she did what she had to do to protect her family… but now nothing seems so certain.

We can’t rewrite history, but can we create a new future?

Set against the dramatic backdrop of Nagasaki before and after the bomb, A DICTIONARY OF MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING is about regret, forgiveness and the exquisite pain of love.

World Rights: Penguin Random House
EAN: 9780091959067
Published: 16 Jul 2015

Meaghan Delahunt

Meaghan Delahunt

Meaghan Delahunt was born in Melbourne, Australia but now lives on the East Coast of Scotland. Her first novel, In The Blue House, was published to widespread acclaim in 2002, winning a regional Commonwealth Prize for Best First Book, the Saltire Award for First Novel, a Scottish Arts Council Book of the year award, and places on the Orange Prize longlist and the Christina Stead Prize shortlist. Her second novel, The Red Book (Granta, 2008), was shortlisted for the Saltire Book of the Year award for 2008.

Meaghan was awarded a UNESCO Aschberg literature residency and Scottish Arts Council bursary in 2000 and an Asialink literature residency in 2002. In 2004 she was Writer in Residence in the Management School at St Andrews University, and she now lectures in Creative Writing at the University of Stirling.

Meaghan’s website: http://www.meaghandelahunt.com/

Meaghan Delahunt is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Jenny. For all enquiries contact jenny@jennybrownassociates.com

Books by Meaghan

To The Island
Granta, June 2011

Meaghan Delahunt - To the Island

He disappeared. That’s all she really knew. In search of her father Andreas, whom she has never met, Lena travels with her small son from Australia to Greece. On the island of Naxos she finds him, a wary, tormented man living in self-imposed exile and haunted by what happened to him under the rule of the Colonels in the 1960s. Slowly Lena unlocks the secrets of her father’s past, and in getting to know him begins to understand the dark realities of contemporary Greek history. To the Island is a book about the impact of larger political events on the lives of ordinary people, and how political and personal betrayals reverberate across generations, beautifully evoking the currents and cross-currents between individuals, within families and in broader society. And in Lena and Andreas’s stories, it shows how difficult it is to confront our personal and collective pasts – and the terrible consequences of being unable to do so.

Praise for To The Island

A wise and compassionate novel, beautifully written
The Times

It is a tale of recovery, of people who go through very bad things and then get better, in a limited and circumscribed way. It has more in common with a novel by Jean Rhys or Ernest Hemingway than the usual story of recovery… The writing is spare, sinewy; the mood goes from dark to a little less dark
The Financial Times

A powerful novel… There is a meditative, painterly quality to this novel, which reflect the way Delahunt, a practising Buddhist, writes and thinks
The Glasgow Herald

This is a novel of quietly intense physicality… Meaghan Delahunt explores the labyrinths of the human heart in a long awaited third novel
Scotland on Sunday

One of the things that lifts Meaghan Delahunt’s novels above the ordinary, besides her attentive and spiky prose, is her political interest… It may always be politics, or a political cause, that anchors Delahunt’s tales, but her mapping of the political onto the personal shows that she never forgets the human faces behind the banners
The Scotsman

Longlisted for the John D. Criticos Prize, London Hellenic Society

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11455072-to-the-island

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