D V Wesselmann

D V WesselmannD V Wesselmann (aka Otis Twelve) won the 2006 Debut Dagger from the British CWA for his novel Imp: Being the Lost Notebooks of Rufus Wilmot Griswold in the Matter of the Death of Edgar Allan Poe. Another ms., On the Albino Farm, won the 2005 London Book Fair Competition. Pulitzer Prize winner, Richard Russo named Wesselmann’s short story ‘Life Among the Bean Bugs’ runner up for the 2005 Kurt Vonnegut Prize.  Wesselmann’s tale, ‘The Goodness of Trees,’ received a Templeton Prize in 2005.  His fiction has been published by The North American Review, Crimespree, The Reader, and in anthologies such as the cult classic, Expletive Deleted (Bleak House) and The Purpose Reader (Cosimo). Despite rumors to the contrary, Wesselmann lives in the middle of North America, though he is considering moving to one of the edges.

Books by D V Wesselmann

IMP: Being the Lost Notebooks of Rufus Wilmot Griswold in the Matter of the Death of Edgar Allan Poe

The lost journals of Poe’s universally despised literary executor, Rufus Wilmot Griswold, reveal the violence, desperation, and horror of the last, lost week of Edgar Allan Poe’s life. Griswold becomes a reluctant “Watson” as Poe struggles to find his child-bride Virginia, entranced on the brink of death by the mesmerist Dr. Rennelle Fox and spirited away into the dark world of 1849 Baltimore.  A freedman named Jupiter becomes more than an ally as he searches for his own wife, sold back into slavery by Fox, and Griswold has his own secrets to face and his faith to test. Many of Poe’s darkest tales and poems – IMP OF THE PERVERSE, THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, PREMATURE BURIAL, LIGEA, ULLALUME, HOP FROG, even THE GOLD BUG become clues and guide the men in the search. Body snatching, dissection, perversion, the pseudo-sciences of the age, a cipher, a riddle, an anagram, and a beautiful young woman named Molly Monk lead them towards Fox’s lair, the mysterious house of pleasure known as the Odalisk.  Griswold is buried alive as bait for Fox, and a horrific confrontation takes place in the gutted Maryland Hospital for the Insane.  Filled with both hidden and obvious references to Poe’s works, the art of the era, and the atmosphere of a corrupt society on the brink of bloody civil war, IMP is a psychological examination of the compulsion to do wrong.  Laudanum, opium, absinthe, and whisky fuel this Gothic-Noir solution to one of the greatest enigmas of history.

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D V Wesselmann is represented at Jenny Brown Associates by Allan –allan@jennybrownassociates.com

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